The Facts Speak For Themselves | 911 Truth News

18 May

Fact #5

In the months leading up to 9/11, there was an unprecedented amount of warnings that “Al-Qaeda” was about to conduct an attack. So many that CIA Director George Tenet was said to be running around with his “hair on fire,” and so many that a lot were not taken seriously “because of “warning fatigue” arising from too many terror warnings.”

One of those warnings came in the form of a Presidential Daily Briefing entitled, “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.” that was initially hidden by the White House.

Another came on July 10th, 2001 that spoke of an “imminent threat,” that was completely omitted from the 9/11 Report, and then lied about after it became public knowledge. Condi even had the audacity to ask “does anybody really believe that somebody would have walked into my office and said, oh, by the way, there’s a chance of a major attack against the United States and I would have said, well, I’m really not interested in that information?”

Cheney said that his “Democratic friends in Congress… need to be very cautious not to seek political advantage by making incendiary suggestions, as were made by some today, that the White House had advance information that would have prevented the tragic attacks of 9/11.”

Fact #6

There are indications that military action in Afghanistan was planned before 9/11.

On 3/7/2001, the New York Times reports that Deputy National Security Advisor Steve Hadley chairs an informal meeting to discuss Al-Qaeda. The approach is “two-pronged and included a crisis warning effort to deal with immediate threats and longer-range planning by senior officials to put into place a comprehensive strategy to eradicate al-Qaeda.”

On 3/15/2001, Jane’s Intelligence Review reports that the U.S. is working with India, Iran, and Russia “in a concerted front against Afghanistan’s Taliban regime.”

On 7/23/2002, Agence France Presse reports that General William Kernan, commander in chief of the Joint Forces Command said that “the details of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan which fought the Taliban and al-Qaeda after the September 11 attacks, were largely taken from a scenario examined by Central Command in May 2001.”

On 6/26/2001, it is reported that “India and Iran will ‘facilitate’ US and Russian plans for ‘limited military action’ against the Taliban if the contemplated tough new economic sanctions don’t bend Afghanistan’s fundamentalist regime.”

In late Summer 2001, the Guardian will report that “reliable western military sources say a US contingency plan exist[s] on paper by the end of the summer to attack Afghanistan from the north.” In early August, a senior Taliban official in the defense ministry will tell journalist Hamid Mir that “[W]e believe Americans are going to invade Afghanistan and they will do this before October 15, 2001, and justification for this would be either one of two options: Taliban got control of Afghanistan or a big major attack against American interests either inside America or elsewhere in the world.”

The President had plans for the invasion of Afghanistan on his desk on 9/9/2001. They “outlined essentially the same war plan that the White House, the CIA and the Pentagon put into action after the Sept. 11 attacks. The administration most likely was able to respond so quickly to the attacks because it simply had to pull the plans “off the shelf.”

On 7/21/2001, three former American officials, Tom Simons, Karl Inderfurth, and Lee Coldren met with Pakistani and Russian intelligence officers in a Berlin hotel. At the meeting, Coldren passes on a message from Bush officials. He later says, “I think there was some discussion of the fact that the United States was so disgusted with the Taliban that they might be considering some military action.” Former Pakistani Foreign Secretary Niaz Naik later says he is allegedly told by senior American officials at the meeting that military action to overthrow the Taliban in Afghanistan is planned to “take place before the snows started falling in Afghanistan, by the middle of October at the latest.” On 8/9/2009, it is reported that Niaz Naik “was found dead in mysterious circumstances at his residence.”

Fact #7

On the day of 9/11, a number of key personnel were “scattered” across the country, and the world. With few exceptions, including Dick Cheney.

The President of the United States, at a time when America was “under attack” from kamikaze hijackers in commercial airliners, in a highly publicized location, 5 miles away from an international airport, in a classroom full of children, was not whisked away by the Secret Service.

His conduct on the morning of 9/11 changed on the first anniversary. What actually happened was “when Chief of Staff Andrew Card told Bush about the second plane crash into the WTC, Bush continued to sit in a Florida elementary school classroom and hear a story about a pet goat for at least seven more minutes.” […] “But one year later, Card claims that after he told Bush about the second WTC crash, “it was only a matter of seconds” before Bush “excused himself very politely to the teacher and to the students, and he left the Florida classroom.”

 

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